Bihou Japanese Maple

Year-Round Color as Other Varieties Fade

Why Bihou Japanese Maple Trees?

The Bihou brings the wow factor to your yard from season to season, with bark that glows a soft golden yellow year-round and newly-forming branches that emerge in a salmon hue.

It’s rare to find a Japanese Maple with a season-to-season appeal. And the Bihou’s leaves are showy too, changing color with the seasons. In spring and summer, the leaves are chartreuse lined with red edges. In fall, they turn a bright yellow-orange.

This golden-bark Japanese Maple can withstand the test of time, known to live a century with optimal care. It’s especially easy too since it just needs a bit of watering and well-drained soil to thrive. It can even withstand shaded areas with ease, adding color to typically-drab spaces.

No matter where it’s placed, from borders to focal points in your plant beds or even containers, this upright, vase-shaped tree thrives.

That’s because we’ve planted, grown and shipped your Bihou with meticulous care. Now, you get a hassle-free tree that’s ready to thrive in your landscape and burst with color quickly.

In fact, when you buy our larger sizes, you can get the Bihou’s iconic color as soon as the first season in your garden.

No matter how you flaunt it, the gorgeous Bihou Maple will add a special touch to your yard.

Planting & Care

1. Planting: In northern areas, the Bihou Japanese Maple can be grown in full sun (6 to 8 hours of sunlight daily). In warmer climates, provide some partial shade (particularly in the afternoon), or choose sites with primarily morning sun. Either way, well-drained soil is ideal.

Outdoors, dig a hole large enough to accommodate the root ball, place your tree, backfill your soil and water to settle the roots. Finally, mulch the area to conserve moisture.

To container-plant, select a pot with drainage holes and ensure it’s about twice the width of your shipped container. Use organic soil mix, place your tree and water to settle the roots.

2. Watering: During summer and dry weather, water deeply once or twice a week, slowly soaking the area around the plant. If you’re not sure when to water, simply check the surrounding soil about 4 inches down and water when it feels dry at this depth.

3. Fertilizing: Japanese Maples are not heavy feeders, so they usually won’t need any additional fertilizer. If you do fertilize, use a slow-release fertilizer in the spring.

4. Pruning: In general, the Bihou Japanese Maple won’t need pruning, other than the occasional ‘wayward’ or damaged branch.